Benefits of Martial Arts

Benefits of Martial Arts Training

Here is a list of the many potential benefits of martial arts training (i.e. health benefits, mental benefits and practical benefits). Of course, please see a doctor before starting any martial arts training because training can be intense and could aggravate any underlying medical conditions (i.e. heart problems).

Potential Health Benefits of Martial Arts Training

  • Martial arts can help to potentially improve HDL (good) cholesterol and lower LDL (bad) cholesterol through vigorous exercise. For more information regarding exercise and cholesterol levels, you should read this WebMD article.
  • Martial arts can help students to lose weight given the significant calorie expenditure during training. For more information, please visit Black Belt Wiki’s section on Martial Arts & Calories Burned.
  • Martial arts can improve a student’s muscular strength and power via a variety of strength training programs (i.e. bodyweight exercises).
  • Martial arts can improve muscle tone.
  • Martial arts utilizes a lot of stretching & warm-up exercises and this can improve flexibility.
  • Martial arts utilizes a lot of conditioning exercises and this can improve a student’s stamina and energy.
  • Martial arts can help with stress relief as you focus on your training and forget the tension of work. For more information, you should read this Mayo Clinic article.
  • Martial arts can release natural endorphins which can improve a student’s mood. For more information on endorphins, you should read this Wikipedia article.
  • Martial arts can help students to gain a better night’s sleep because they are tired after a martial arts class.
  • Martial arts can improve a person’s balance as they learn different stances, kicking positions, etc.
  • Martial arts and strenuous physical activity can potentially improve bone density or help to slow bone loss. For more information, you should read this Harvard Medical School article.
  • Martial arts can improve coordination as students need to combine a wide variety of kicks, punches and stances in activities such as kata training, sparring, etc.
  • Martial arts can provide an excellent form of cross training, especially for endurance sports.
  • Martial arts can improve athletic performance in other sports because martial arts training improves an athlete’s overall coordination, balance, strength, stamina, etc.

Potential Mental Benefits of Martial Arts Training

  • Martial arts can help to improve focus and concentration as students must achieve difficult tasks (i.e. breaking a wooden board) with accuracy and power in order to avoid possible injury.
  • Martial arts can improve discipline as students learn how to obey instructions and work with others.
  • Martial arts can improve a student’s confidence because they learn how to master difficult techniques (i.e. spinning hook kick).
  • Martial arts can help with stress relief as students focus on their training and forget the tension of work.
  • Martial arts can stimulate a student’s mind because they have to learn new techniques, terminology, etc.
  • Martial arts can reduce fear and anxiety as students learn to deal with physically stressful situations (i.e. self-defense, sparring, etc.).

Potential Practical Benefits of Martial Arts Training

  • Martial arts can provide self-defense training.
  • Martial arts can help students to make new friends as they share the camaraderie of training and practice.
  • Martial arts can be lots of fun!

References

  1. Taekwondo Animals.com, Taekwondo Health Benefits, http://www.taekwondoanimals.com/taekwondo-health-benefits.asp
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, The Benefits of Physical Activity, http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/health/
  3. Harvard Medical School, Slowing bone loss with weight-bearing exercise, https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/slowing-bone-loss-with-weight-bearing-exercise
  4. Mayo Clinic, 7 Benefits of Regular Physical Activity, http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389
  5. Mayo Clinic, Exercise and stress: Get moving to manage stress, https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/exercise-and-stress/art-20044469
  6. WebMD, Exercise and Cholesterol: How Much Is Enough?, https://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/features/cholesterol-how-much-exercise#1
  7. Wikipedia, Endorphins, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endorphins